October 14, 2016

9 Great Latin American Food Facts


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Peru is known for its ceviche and fried guinea pig.

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Oaxaca is known for its seven moles: manchamanteles, chichilo, amarillo, rojo, verde, coloradito, and negro.

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Yucca, guava, lime beans, black-eyed peas, and corn are native to the Spanish Caribbean.

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The “superfood” açai berry comes from northern Brazil

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Yerba Mate—an infusion made from the yerba plant—is traditionally served in a gourd with a metal straw.

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La marraqueta is a traditional Chilean yeast bread. Chileans consume almost 220 pounds of bread per person, per year.

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The cochinita pibil (pork) is part of the culinary legacy of southeast Mexico.

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Arepas, a grilled and stuffed flatbread made of ground maize, and tostones, twice fried plantains, are national dishes.

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The masa for the popular Puerto Rican pasteles consists of green banana, plantain, taro, pumpkin, and annatto oil.

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